Property Sign-up

Signing up is free and only takes a few minutes. Sign up online now

View on Map

See Oasis B&B located on our map. Click to open map

Other Cities in Romania

Oasis B&B

Address: 15 Privighetorilor str., Costinesti, Romania
Average rating: No ratings received
Rooms from: US$ 57.00



Oasis B&B

Photos of Oasis B&B
Previous Image
Play Slideshow
Next Image
9 photos
Oasis B&B is a homely property with eight double rooms, all equipped with air conditioning, cable television, free wireless internet access, mini-bar, safe and en-suite bathrooms with hairdryers.

Guests at Oasis love to lie by our large pool, with its sun deck and pool bar. We also have a dining room, a fully equipped kitchen and a large terrace with a BBQ at guests' disposal.

Costinesti is a well-known holiday resort on Romania's Black Sea coast. Oasis B&B is just one kilometre from the sea.

We have bicycles for hire and can arrange motor boat rental with prior arrangement.

Breakfast and parking are included in the rates, and we also offer a transfer service from/to Kogalnicanu International Airport and Constanta railroad station,with extra cost and prior arrangements.

Children under the age of 7 may stay for free in their parents' room.
 

Located Near


Costinesti is located 20 km south of Constanţa, one of the oldest cities in Romania, founded around 600 BC.

The city is located in the Dobrogea region of Romania, on the Black Sea coast. It is the capital of Constanţa County and the largest city in the region.

A number of inscriptions found in the city and its vicinity show that Constanţa lies where Tomis once stood. Tomis (also called Tomi) was a Greek colony in the province of Scythia Minor on the Black Sea's shore, founded around 600 BC for commercial exchanges with the local Getic populations.

In 8 CE, Ovid was banished to Tomis, on the Black Sea, by the exclusive intervention of the Emperor Augustus, without any participation of the Senate or of any Roman judge.

Main sights:

Ovid's Square - Designed by the sculptor Ettore Ferrari in 1887, the statue dedicated to the Roman poet, Publius Ovidius Naso, gives its name to this square.

The Roman Mosaics (Edificul Roman cu Mozaic)
A vast complex on three levels once linked the upper town to the harbor. Today, only about a third of the original edifice remains, including more than 9,150 sq ft (850 m2) of colorful mosaics. Built toward the end of the 4th century AD and developed over the centuries, it was the city's commercial center until the 7th century. Archaeological vestiges point to the existence of workshops, warehouses and shops in the area. Remains of the Roman public baths can still be seen nearby. Aqueducts brought water six miles (10 km) to the town.

The Genoese Lighthouse (Farul Genovez)
Soaring 26 feet (7.9 m), this lighthouse was built in 1860 by the Danubius and Black Sea Company to honor Genoese merchants who established a flourishing sea trade community here in the 13th century.

The Casino (Cazinoul)
Completed between the two World Wars in art nouveau style according to the plans of the architects, Daniel Renard and Petre Antonescu, the Casino features sumptuous architecture and a wonderful view of the sea. The pedestrian area around the Casino is a sought-after destination for couples and families, especially at sunset.

The House with Lions (Casa cu Lei)
Blending pre-Romantic and Genovese architectural styles, this late 19th century building features four columns adorned with imposing sculptured lions. During the 1930s, its elegant salons hosted the Constanţa Masonic Lodge.

The Archeology Park (Parcul Arheologic)
The park houses columns and fragments of 3rd and 4th century buildings and a 6th century tower.

St. Peter & Paul Orthodox Cathedral
Constructed in Greco-Roman style between 1883 and 1885, the church was severely damaged during World War II and was restored in 1951. The interior murals display a neo-Byzantine style combined with Romanian elements best observed in the iconostasis and pews, chandeliers and candlesticks (bronze and brass alloy), all designed by Ion Mincu and completed in Paris.

The Great Mahmudiye Mosque (Moscheea Mare Mahmoud II)
Built in 1910 by King Carol I, the mosque is the seat of the Mufti, the spiritual leader of the 55,000 Muslims (Turks and Tatars by origin) who live along the coast of the Dobrogea region. The building combines Byzantine and Romanian architectural elements, making it one of the most distinctive mosques in the area. The centerpiece of the interior is a large Persian carpet, a gift from Sultan Abdul Hamid. Woven at the Hereke Handicraft Center in Turkey, it is one of the largest carpets in Europe, weighing 1,080 pounds. The main attraction of the mosque is the 164 ft (50 m) minaret (tower) which offers a stunning view of the old downtown and harbor. Five times a day, the muezzin climbs 140 steps to the top of the minaret to call the faithful to prayer.

The Fantasio Theatre (Teatrul Fantasio)
Built in 1927 by Demostene Tranulis, a local philanthropist of Greek origin, this theatre used to be called "Tranulis" before 1947, after the name of its benefactor. It's a fine building featuring elements of neoclassical architecture, located in the heart of the city, on Ferdinand Boulevard.

Mangalia city, located 20 km south of Costinesti, is a city and a port on the Romanian coast of the Black Sea in the south-east of Constanţa County.

A Greek colony named Callatis (Kallatis) was founded in 6th century BC by the city of Heraclea Pontica. Its first silver coinage was minted in approximately 350 BC. In 72 BC, Callatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was assigned to the Roman province of Moesia Inferior.

Throughout the 2nd century AD, the city built defensive fortifications and the minting of coinage under the Roman emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla continued. Callatis suffered multiple invasions in the third century AD but recovered in the 4th century AD to retain its status as an important trade hub and port city.

Since the 9th century it was known by the Turks as Pangalia, by the Romanians as Tomisovara and by the Greeks as Panglicara and it was one of the most important ports on the west coast of the Black Sea. Mangalia (former Callatis) is the oldest city, continuously inhabited, on the present territory of Romania.

Tourist attractions in Mangalia:

Callatis Artifacts
Mosque
The Scythian tomb discovered in 1959 where archaeologists unearthed fragments of a papyrus in Greek, the first document of this kind in Romania
The incineration tombs (the necropolis of the Callatis citadel, dating back to the 4th-2nd centuries BC)
The ruins of the Callatis citadel (6th century BC)
The Turkish Mangalia Mosque (16th century)
The Archaeology Museum which shelters a rich collection of amphorae and sculptures from the Hellenistic epoch, fragments of stone sarcophagi, etc.

The city has been well known in recent years as the place where one of the largest summer festivals in Romania takes place: Callatis Festival.

Facilities

Internet:
  • - WiFi
- Cots Available
- Kitchen Facilities - Laundry Facilities
- TV Lounge - Board Games
Swimming Pool:
  • - Outdoor
Internet Access:
  • - Free of Charge
- Bicycle Hire - Cable TV
- Outdoor Terraced Area - BBQ Area
Breakfast:
  • - Included
- Airport Transfers
Parking:
  • - Bicycle Parking
Business Centre:
  • - Photocopying/Fax Service
- Hair Dryer - Air Conditioning
- Safe Deposit Box - Mini Bar
- Luggage Storage - Wheelchair Accessible